Tag Archives: Dressage

Burghley Horse Trials Day 2

Day 2 at Burghley Horse Trials was as lovely as Day 1. The sun shone brightly and the air was warm. There was clearly far more people at the event today as the stands by the 4th Session were standing room only. The riding continued to impress with Mark Todd and Oliver Townend holding most of the top spots. It was interesting to watch obviously frisky horses being made to behave and do as they are told. There was clearly Dressage By Negotiation today.

Because I don’t feel I know it all, we were able to purchase small ear radios which broadcast expert commentary. It did my heart good to note that my observations from yesterday were spot on, not to mention the moment one of the commentators actually said, “Corners are your friends” when discussing appropriate distances in the test. I didn’t stand up a shout Buh-yah! but I did feel like it.

Back to what I saw…. Some things we need to be working on and I will be pushing us toward is a greater use of the back end of the horse. The horse must move from back to front and not the other way around. The back end must provide the impulsion while the front end provides the direction. I know I have said this before, but again, I feel I have more veracity now. This back impulsion is so clearly evident in the Extended Trot where the horses seem to float over the grass rather that stomp through it. The deep step with the upward thrust to make the stride provides the lifting power this movement requires. I see lots of trotting poles in our future…….

Continuing with the use of the flank, the commentators gave a lovely talk about the stretching of the horse from the flank to the bit in the walk. Again, the power of the Extended Walk comes from the inside(!) hind leg which drives the outside shoulder and should make the horse want to step through the bit. I am suspecting this is more than Magic’s “throw my head down and evade the bit”. In the midst of all this, the horse’s head must be free to move in a natural manner. There is a real art to getting just the right amount of touch on the reins to allow all of this. We have lots to work on!

The last thing I’d like to discuss is the Halt and Rein Back. This seemed to be a bit of bugbear for many of the competitors. The previous move was a Collected Trot coming from M. The key was to stop square without going through walk. Once the horse stops, he must be both relaxed, aware and prepared. He can not switch off, start swinging his head or chew his bit. In a few cases, please don’t drool either. Once the horse has stood square, then there is the balanced walk back of 5 steps. It is vital that this be done in diagonal pairs with deliberate steps. The horse must not display any tension or resistance to the move or the aids. Uh…yeah. Did I mention it also has to be straight with no swinging of the quarters? Now I know this can be mastered by (many) hours of practice and is a good thing for the horse to know in case it gets itself caught in a tight space, but it is tricky. What I noted was that many competitors rushed the Halt to Rein Back. The horse was not actually square and settled before making the backward movement and this resulted in a myriad of small errors which seriously affected the marks. Also, because the back steps were not positive, many actually dragging a foot, the next move of striding off into a Medium Walk looked more Riding School Pedantic than World Class Equestrian – and the marks made that point.

Today was great and, yes, the missing circle which has become known as #MarkToddMoment, did appear. Apparently under FEI rules for Eventing, the repeat and correction of a missed move is allowed in Dressage because these are not specifically dressage trained horses. As these horses are All-Arounders, some grace must be given. I am glad that there is some recognition of this, but I do have to say that I am incredibly impressed by the level of training and presentation these horses have. There are several that I am convinced could compete in pure Dressage and place in the very top. I am looking forward to tomorrow as Burghley as had a bit of a facelift this year. The course walk should be fascinating and the competition amazing!

What Happen Today At Burghley — Day 1

Today was the first day of the Burghley Horse Trials – a 3 day event that tests the world’s best horses and riders to highest level of their ability. It is a spectacular 5 days.

Yesterday was the Trot Up, which checks each horse’s health and fitness. Something which is vital when the animal is going to be asked to show a level of gymnastics and athleticism few will ever experience. Unfortunately 2 horses did not pass the Trot Up and were withdrawn. A real heartbreak for both horse and rider. There were a couple of close calls which means those horses will be carefully monitored throughout the event.

Today, 30 August, was the first of the Dressage Days. To bring you visually into the scene, the gentle breeze blew, ruffling the flags which lined the low white fenced dressage arena. Warm sun shined down on the gleaming horses who performed on the thick green grass while the steel drums played Caribbean music softly in the background.

The Test was new – only created last year, 2017. I was surprised because it did not have the usual elements of a Serpentine, or Counter Canter. Instead it has a large section of Medium & Extended Walk. There is a big trend right now to develop and improve the walk, making it a positive and dynamic part of dressage and not just the relaxing poor cousin. I was very pleased to see it and even more pleased to see how serious the judges took it as reflected in the often lower marks that the trot and canter sections.

The Test is loaded with “Bends and Balances”. There is a lovely ask of a Shoulder In down the quarter line moving to a Half Pass. To do this properly, the horse and rider must move absolutely straight down that quarter line with the outside should perfectly in line with the inside hind foot. A quick straighten and rebalance in 1 stride to move into the Half Pass. Wow! Hard! Impressive. Missed a fair few times with 3.5 – 5.5 marks being given.

The hardest move, based on the fact that several riders missed it totally, was a Half Pass from V to I, then down the centre line to a 20m Circle Left – Lateral, Straight, Bend. I think this was more of an ask for the rider than the horse as the buzzer went 5 times to tell the rider of their error. I was rather surprised that the riders could take a buzzer and repeat a move then go on to the missed move and finish the test. In Pure Dressage, to have missed a move would be a 0 on that moves score. There did not seem to be this penalty as Mark Todd on Campino, second rider of the day, was the first to miss the circle and ended the day in the top 10.

The Flying Change also was score breaker. The judges were looking for a fluid change that was both elevated and straight with both front and hind changing at the same time. I think our Tuscany would have shined at this! The judges were definitely looking for the big step into the Change and the preparation was 3 steps of Collected Canter. Lots of horses showed they could do it on one rein but not equally well on the other. Of course we do need to remember that these horses are not Grand Prix Dressage horses or trained to that level, so this is a big ask of them. I was very pleased to see how well they responded to the questions.

The last thing I noticed today was the number of new rider faces as Burghley. It is always lovely to see the previous champions and Olympians, but it is a treat to see the riders coming up and through. It shows that this sport is very much alive and growing. And these new riders are every bit as good as the old friends we know and love. The level of riding I saw was very impressive and I can see an exciting week ahead!