Tag Archives: Rider Weight

The Question of Weight

The question of a rider’s weight is a tricky minefield. I am the last person to ask about weight as I am currently struggling with post injury weight gain, but I do have both knowledge and opinions. Providing you have the right horse and are in good physical health, there is no reason why anyone can’t ride.

I remember a article I came across a few years back asking who was actually healthier: an 8 stone (112lb) model or a 14 stone (196 lbs) rugby player. Both were women. After a series of tests it was decided that the rugby player was more fit because she was actively involved in sport, but they were both healthy — albeit the model was on the lower edge of what was good for her. The rugby player was full of muscle and had a good BMI, heart rate, and cholesterol. The model had virtually no fat, exceedingly low BMI, good heart rate & cholesterol, but she did smoke. So why was the model preferred over the rugby player? Aesthetics. Fashion. Culture.

Currently the fashion is at many colleges to not allow anyone over 12 stone (168 lbs) to ride. They say the horses can’t take it. It is not healthy for the horses. It is bad for their backs. This is where common sense and emotions clash. Even in my most fit and healthy days as a competitive adult I would have struggled to meet the 12 stone guideline. My body isn’t made that way.  My doctor has said I need to be 13 stone (miles from my current 15). But what is important is not just the rider’s weight, but an accurate measurement of what a horse can easily carry.

I had a long talk with my Vet, Laura, about this very conversation as we now have a new, fine boned pony. I thought she was a touch underweight but Laura is convinced that Rosie is just great as she is. So we talked riders and weights. Now in Rosie’s case the rider’s weight isn’t going to be an issue as she will only carry small children. But what about Magic? Or Dora? Or Henry? What should they carry?

I have seen women (yes women and never a man!) ride a small to small-ish pony —  Callie & Pasha types– and they are clearly too big for their mount. They are 13 stone and not a very trim ones at that. It is obvious to all the spectators that the horse is struggling and possibly in pain. Yet these women are allowed to complete and even win their class. Yes the horse doesn’t run out on them or buck or spin, and I suspect it is because they simply physically can’t do it with that weight on them. What makes me furious is that the Stewards allow them to continue. I only know of 1 case where a Steward stepped in and stopped the ride. The stink from it was amazing and filled many Comments sections. I thought we equestrians were in it for being with the horse and not just being in it for ourselves.

There is real damage an overweight for the horse rider can do. The pressure on the back and spine can cause permanent disfigurement and/or something called Kissing Spine, where the vertebrae touch. It can cause psychological issues or trauma. The time needed to “fix” this is long and arduous. In cases of Kissing Spine there is no come back and the horse must be retired from riding to be a companion.  They will live the rest of their life on pain killers. All because someone really didn’t think before they rode.

So how do we make a reasonable decision regarding the weight of the rider versus the comfortable weight a horse can carry?  I looked up guidelines of various national and international organisations to find this answer.  Not that I am 100% perfect on this, but here is the formula I came up with:

= [(xkg x 0.2) x 2.2] ÷ 14

The total weight to be carried (∑) is equal to the weight of the horse in kilograms (xkg) times 20%. This will give you a Kilo weight guideline. If you need the guideline is pounds, then multiply that answer by 2.2.  If, like me, you need it in Stones, then divide the pounds answer by 14.

For my horses over 20, I use this formula

= {[(xkg x 0.2) x 2.2] –1xYR}÷ 14

The total weight to be carried (∑) is equal to the weight of the horse in kilograms (xkg) times 20%. This will give you a Kilo weight guideline. If you need the guideline is pounds, then multiply that answer by 2.2 (So far it’s not changed).  Now you subtract 1 pound for every year (xYR) over the age of twenty. If you need it in Stones, now divide by 14.

Yes, it’s a bit complicated but if you put it in a spreadsheet like Open Office Calc or Excel, you only have to do it once as they will do the hard part for you! Don’t forget to save.

So I weigh my horses every month and with these formulas I can protect them from overweight riders and adjust their feeds as necessary.  As a horse owner, it is vital that we keep on top of our horse’s health.  Maths is not my favourite thing to do, but then again, neither is paying Vet Bills for injuries I could have avoided by being sensible.

Riding is great exercise for the rider and will give them both an emotional exhilaration and a physical challenge. Competition is a great way to see how you are progressing and how good your training is. Your horse should love to show off how beautiful they are and it should be a positive experience for everyone — horse, rider & spectator.  As a rider, it is your responsibility to make sure you are not injuring your friend by being just that bit too big for them. If you are too big, then maybe you should add a New Friend to your stables that is right for you.

Remember, it’s not about us. It’s all about The Horse.

Keep Riding!

Kimberly